Friday, January 12, 2007

Building the Spanish Farm




I thought I'd take the time to write a short piece on how I built the Spanish Farm.

I started off with the imaes I found on the internet - they are still up on the blog a few entries back. From these I drew a rough cartoon to work out the relationships of the various buildings to each other, their rough proportions and to get an idea of the kind of details I wanted to include.

The next thing I did was to work out the dimensions. My Peninsular collection will never grow to be too large, so I felt that I could make the buildings a bit larger than I otherwise might, thinking that the larger they are, the more useable they becoime in a low-level game.

I took my note from the height of the walling I use, which is about 40mm high. From that, and with no small degree of fudging, the rest of the dimensions were reasonably easy to work out.

For the record:

The larger "dual" building with the peaked roofs are 80mm wide and 190mm long. The wall heights are 100mm and 90mm. the roof peaks are 15mm higher than the wall heights.

The smaller "dual" building is 60mm wide and 160mm long. That part of the roof that slopes from left to right is 80mm high at it's highest point, falling away to 70mm. The other is 90mm high at it's highest point, falling down to 80mm.

The wing is 60mm wide and 120mm long. It is 70mm high at it's highest point, falling away to 60mm at the other side.

The little lean to out the back is 60mm wide and 30mm long. It is 50mm high at it's highest point, falling away to 40mm at it's lowest vertical point.

All the walls were cut from foam core and apetures cut to take windows and doors from model railway accessory kits.

Finishing was done in the same way as the other Spanish buildings I've described in earlier posts. I hope the images add what the text may lack!

6 comments:

Bluebear Jeff said...

Ah,

Thank you, this helps a great deal. It gives me lots of good ideas. I particularly like how the differences in heights and roof angles make the whole look far more interesting.

If you are unfamiliar with it (and since you are interested in the Peninsular War), you might want to check out Foly Hermans' article on building a Spanish village. Here is the URL:

http://www.fusiliers.net/wargaming6.htm

Thank you again for this explanatory post -- I find it very useful.


-- Jeff

http://saxe-bearstein.blogspot.com/

Bloggerator said...

You're welcome Jeff.

Roly's Peninsular buildings (and the eye-candy pix in Mr Darnells' terrain book/mag) were primary sources of inspiration in my Peninsula project.

Cheers,

Greg

Grand Duchy of Stollen 1768 said...

Hello there Greg,

Fascinating stuff! It's great fun and terribly interesting to have a glimpse "behind the scenes" and learn how someonce conceptualized and constructed his pieces of scenery and/or buildings. Perhaps you might become the "new" Ian Weekley? Will your peninsular collection be strictly for skirmish level actions, or will it grow enough for larger battles?

Enjoy the weekend,

Stokes

Bloggerator said...

G'day Stokes,

I don't know about "the new Ian Weekly" - I don't think I have the patience to work at that level!

I wrote the piece because I never really saw anything on how someone might go about converting a 2D image into a 3D object. I thought some might find it useful.

I'm sure I'll add bits and pieces to the "Peninsular Collection" as time goes on. I need another few houses, a coaching inn and a church at least!

All the best,

Greg

Stryker said...

Hi Greg

Firstly let me start by saying how disappointed I was not to win the coveted Poet Laureate position – I had even cleared a place of honour in my wargame cabinet for those lovely Austrian fellows. Maybe next time…

I am fascinated by the speed and skill with which you are assembling your Spanish Real Estate empire. Good stuff! One question – what paint colour/manufacturer are you using for your rifle green on Sharpe’s boys? I am about to paint some 20mm Riflemen and can’t decide on the correct colour.

Regards
Ian

Bloggerator said...

Ian,

When one of Sharpie's boys is being issued tis coat he goes to Mr Vallejo, the Spanish storemaster and asks him for a "Goblin Green".

Apparrently this makes some sense to him.

Regards,

Greg

PS - sympathies on your lack of literary success.