Wednesday, August 02, 2006

Painted Conversion



I wound up painting him this evening while watching a Babylon 5 DVD as the Colonel of la Reine - just so that lonely drummer would have someone to talk to! I think he turned out pretty well, being particularly pleased with his hat.

I really think this conversion has given the casting a completely different look and will be pleased to have him on my wargaming table.

10 comments:

Poruchik said...
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Poruchik said...

Greg,

He looks awesome! Thanks for posting him!

Do you mind if I borrow this idea of yours to use him as Mounted Regimental Colonel for my Russians? Actually he may be too heroic for a Russian Colonel, I may need to make him Colonel of some of my Vulgarian Regiments.

Donald~

Bloggerator said...

Donald,

I'm glad you like him!

As for doing your own, I'd encourage you to give it a try. This has been my first outing in this arena - not for any lack of contemplation previously! - and it was easier than I thought it would be.

Regards,

Greg

Jim said...

Very nice. Keep up the good work!

Jim

Nick Elsden said...

Dear Greg, it is really good to see your conversion work in the various stages, it reminds me of the sort of 'practical' articles that used to be in 1970s modelling and wargaming magazines, but seem to have diassappeared as we are all so 'spoonfed' with new castings that few people seem to bother ... or perhaps it is all being done quietly away from public view ?

Bloggerator said...

Hi Nick,

Maybe I ought to be pitching this sort of thing to Mr Hyde - "Beginners Corner" for Battlegames?

One of the things I like about limiting myself to just the one range of miniatures is that it makes me think creatively about the castings. To me a miniature is not a 7YW Prussian Musketeer, but an infantryman, marching, wearing gaiters, a lapelled coat with turnbacks and small cuffs - now, what else can I do with him?

To some degree I think that this is part of the charm of the Spencer Smiths miniatures - wargamers make up entire regiments of Cuirassiers from the one mounted officer casting.

I've always enjoyed (preferred?) the modelling and painting side of the hobby and being able to produce the odd unique figure is very satisfying. Best of all, it's not at all difficult.

Regards,

Greg

Alte Fritz said...

I've enjoyed following the progress of your conversions. The story would make for a great article in Battlegames. :)

Maybe next, you could tackle the conversion of the British firing pose into a fellow reaching into his cartridge pouch with the right arm and holding his musket in his left hand with the butt resting on the ground. See the old Hezzlewood picture that was in Military Modelling (front cover) for an example. I started this, but never finished it. You have to cut off the right arm and then pin it back on in a different position. You can buy spare musket castings from RSM, so you don't have to save the cut off.

Alte Fritz

Poruchik said...

Greg,

I like the idea of a beginners corner for Battlegames! I second it.

I also like the idea of converting figures, you've got me thinking how I could convert 27 Cossacks to Kalmuks for the SYW. I think it'll be a fairly easy conversion!

I've already done some very basic converting of Turks to Egyptians for another project I'm working on, so why not!

I agree also that part of what makes the old volumes, Grant, Young, Featherstone, so re-readable (sp?) is the amazing conversions that make a collection of soldiers almost exclusive!

Donald~

Anonymous said...

Jim: I'll give that conversion a try and see what a mess I make of it - I've got that copy of MM floating about for a reference. Let's see how I go.

Donald: I'm sure the Graf von Grunt is a Willie with a large putty moustache added on!

What's it take to make a cossak into a Kalmyk? (sounds like a riddle!) I've got a few Cossaks at home that aren't doing too much. Let me know and I'll have a shot.

Regards,

Greg

Jim said...

Greg,

After admiring your pictures for a while, last night I began wondering how you took them. I have tried with my little Olympus D460 camera. Let's not talk about the results, I'll get a headache.

So I'm here to beg for details about how you take pictures of your figues. You have been getting better at it as time has passed.

What's the secret? Speak slowly and use small words. :-)

Thanks,

Jim
Who lives in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, just in case you ever wonder where you blog responders come from.